Stories of faith, life, and love

Category: suspense

What I’m Reading: My First Suspense

I can remember my first day of school. I can remember my first kiss, my first time having frozen yogurt, and the first movie my family went to a theater to watch together. It was E.T., by the way.

Some things stick with you through the years. Others leave you with only the impression they made. Over the next few weeks, I want to share some first books with you. These are books I clearly remember as being my firsts for various reasons. Most of them are older books, but you should still be able to find them. I’d encourage it, because they are well worth it.

I have a confession to make. I tend to steer clear of suspense. I get creeped out way too easily. But I think today’s author began writing romantic Christian suspense before it was a standard genre in the Christian fiction world. And while each of her books have a little mystery in them or a little danger, today’s series held more than I was used to from her. At least, it read as more suspenseful to me, a bit creepier. And so, I include it as my first Christian romantic suspense.

If you haven’t already, I encourage you to find a copy of the Egypt trilogy by Linda Chaikin. The series’ World War I backdrop of battles and intrigue are enough to add action and suspense, but the author weaves a deadly who-done-it throughout the three stories. We’re left questioning the motives of characters we think are true. We fear for the safety of the characters we love.

Arabian Winds begins the series with Nurse Allison Wescott serving on a medical mission boat in Egypt. Her life is full of promise, as she’s engaged to a man who is working to serve as a chaplain in Oswald Chambers’s camp. When war breaks out during her holiday, Allison becomes part of a mystery surrounding two dead bodies and Brett Holden, a British officer determined to interrogate her. But there are also sparks, and Allison is faced with more choices for her life than she ever imagined.

Allison’s story continues in Lions of the Desert. World War I has begun, and Allison has moved from serving on the medical mission boat to tending wounded soldiers on the front lines. When Brett Holden reappears, Allison is unprepared for his return. However, the two find themselves in the middle of murder, and Allison has to figure out who she can trust before it’s too late.

The series ends with Valiant Hearts. With Brett in hot water with his superiors, Allison wants to trust him and his motives. But there are too many secrets and a treasure map that promises to bring its owner great riches. Before she can figure out whether Brett has “gone bad”, they’re thrown into danger from a deadly German spy who wants what everyone says Brett has. With Allison caught in the middle, her life is at risk if they can’t unmask the spy and find out the truth about Brett.

I’ve read this series many times since it came out in 1997. It gives me just enough mystery to make me want to read it with the lights one without making me want to sleep with them on too! And while there are clues throughout the stories, the author does a great job of keeping the reader off balance just enough to keep the ending a surprise.

I hope you enjoy this first as much as I have. Do you remember your first Christian romantic suspense? Have you read this series?

What I’m Reading: An Aria for Nick

At the risk of sounding like I’ve become the president of the Hallee Bridgeman fan club, today’s review is for An Aria for Nick. (I’m not sure that’s a thing but wouldn’t it be great if your favorite Christian authors had fan clubs? Someone should look into that.) Other than Kristen Heitzmann, I don’t think I’ve reviewed any other author’s books as frequently, but I’m always looking for a good deal and a great story. Hallee’s books often fit both categories. Besides, I’ve reviewed books one and three in the series. It only makes sense that I should go back and take care of book two! Let’s take a look at An Aria for Nick.

Sometimes life doesn’t go like we planned. Events beyond our control seem to conspire against us, or our own choices land us in the middle of consequences we never imagined. Aria and Nick understand this better than most.

Aria’s love for Nick never got a chance thanks to Nick’s stubborn refusal to entertain the idea that a girl like Aria could be interested in a boy like him. He makes sure of it when he enlists in the military.

Aria is just as headstrong. She pursues friendship with Nick throughout their school years and through letters during his time in the military. Maybe one day, Nick will see how much she cares for him. Only that day doesn’t come. Instead, Aria is met with the news that the man she loves has been killed in the line of duty.

She’s lost her hope of love with Nick, but her losses keep coming. Aria’s dream of playing piano professionally are lost when her wrist is injured. The situation leaves her no choice. Aria must find and live a new dream. This new direction puts her in contact with brilliant scientists as she works to develop nuclear technology. It also puts her in the crosshairs of the enemy when she discovers a plot to use her technology in a terrorist attack on the United States.

Aria doesn’t know who to trust. When the man she loved comes back from the dead as the one entrusted to protect her and stop the attack, Aria’s world is turned upside down. Aria and Nick must work together and trust each other in order to prevent nuclear destruction. This is made more difficult as their insecurities and the hurts of the past wreak havoc in each personal interaction. Though the feelings they shared in the past are reawakened, Aria and Nick have to choose whether to embrace those feelings or ignore them without the assurance of what each choice will bring to their futures.

Nick and Aria aren’t that different from me and you. Sure, our one true love probably didn’t come back from the dead. And most of us are probably not brilliant nuclear scientists. But when you remove all the physical trappings of the story, you find a reality that speaks to each of us. We love to plan what our futures will look like. We’re encouraged to do it from the time we are young. Don’t believe me? Did you ever have to write a “what I want to be when I grow up” essay? Our childhood is all about preparing us for the future, and we are pushed earlier and earlier to decide how we want that future to look.

Sometimes that life doesn’t go like we think it should. Events beyond our control throw us off our path and onto other foreign ones. Choices we’ve made have consequences with far more impact than we imagined possible. Even in the times when we end up at our originally planned destination, a look at the path that brought us there shows a drastically different road to success than we dreamed we would take.

When we realize this, the temptation is strong to give in to fear, doubt, hurt, and anger. As believers, we have a different option. Trust. We can’t trust things will work out the way we want them to. We can’t trust that the hurt is finished. But we can trust that God is in control. He knew the path our life would take, the good and bad choices we would make, and the ending destination before we were even born. The Psalms tell us He had every one of our days written in His book before we’d even lived one of them.

He doesn’t promise to end all the bad or surprising things in our lives. We live in a decaying, sin-marred world. Horrible things happen. The unexpected happens. But God does promise that He will be beside us in each thing we face. He will give us strength and peace and hope. The hope is that whatever happens, He will make us more into His image as we go through it with Him leading the way.

Fear and doubt no longer color our decisions. Instead, we move forward in confidence knowing God is by our side no matter what the future holds.

What I’m Reading – Justice Delayed

When I’m under pressure I have the bad habit of procrastinating. As my deadline looms ever closer, I find myself rebelling against the clock. I have plenty of excuses for what I’m doing. I’m tired after a long day at work. I need to make dinner. There’s a new Hallmark movie starting soon. And if the procrastination is to its highest levels, I need to wash the dishes.

I’m ashamed to say the excuses win out in the fight for my attention. And they are all true and some even good things. My husband is thrilled to come home to a clean kitchen despite the fact that it’s simply a way to further my procrastination. I’m not sure why I do it. I know I shouldn’t do it. I want the pressure to end, but the pressure is what pushes me into procrastination mode. It’s a vicious cycle, and it’s one only I can break.

Andi Hollister from Justice Delayed by Patricia Bradley understands excuses all too well. For years, she has worked to put her sisters murder behind her. Days before the murder’s execution is to take place, circumstances bring to light the possibility that the wrong man is about to die. Andi is hesitant to accept this. Her excuses range from a confession and subsequent conviction to simply not having the strength to face the pain of losing her sister all over again.

Andi is a go-getter when it comes to her job as a reporter. She doesn’t hesitate to do whatever is necessary to get her story. When her attitude leads her into trouble and friends and family tell her she needs to slow down and let God lead her in her actions, Andi has excuses at the ready. The stories need told. Why should she ask for help when she can do it herself? Why should she wait on a God that took her sister from her?

While Andi is searching for the truth about her sister’s murder, she becomes a target herself. Tracking down answers to questions that should have been asked during the first investigation puts Andi in harms way and aggravates an old back injury. It’s this injury that give birth to Andi’s most devastating excuses.

To deal with her physical pain, Andi was prescribed a pain medication. While she knows in her head that pain medication can be dangerous, she has convinced herself that she is immune to becoming addicted. Even as her drug use causes issues for her in her quest for the truth, Andi continues to make excuses. She’s too busy to have the surgery that will correct the back problem. She was prescribed the medication. She’s too smart and capable to fall into the pit of addiction. She is only using when she has pain. Even when she begins to see a problem developing in her use, Andi convinces herself one more dose can’t hurt anything. Besides, she needs it to finish the job.

Some excuses, like the ones I use to justify procrastination, don’t have a great potential for causing harm in my life. They need put in their proper place and dealt with, but missing deadlines and sleepless nights cramming to get the job done are more than likely the worst results I’ll face. Excuses like those Andi uses to justify her drug use are far more deadly. Continuing drug use could cause her to lose her job, her health, and endanger herself and others. The ripples of those choices can keep going forever.

Andi’s excuses to misuse her prescriptions may sound horrible to us, but we need to consider how often we make those types of excuses in our own lives. It may not be for drug use, but how often do we excuse sinful behaviors that come between us and God? How often do we excuse a lie with the idea that it’s only “a little lie”? How often do we gossip about others excusing it because “it’s true”? How often do we ignore the prompting of the Holy Spirit because “we must not have heard Him correctly”? The list could go on and on. We sin in our anger and call it justified. We choose to say or do things we know are not godly because of what others will think of us if we don’t.

We excuse our behaviors as being necessary and not harming anyone, and we can’t honestly say that. And just as bad are the times when we acknowledge our sin and laugh it off because “everyone does it” and “God will forgive it because He knows I’m human”.

It doesn’t matter what excuse we use. Sin is sin, and it puts a wall between us and our heavenly Father. It’s time to rid ourselves of the excuses, acknowledge our sins, and turn away from them. Only when we get rid of the excuses can God work in us to make us more like Christ.

What I'm Reading – Justice Delayed

When I’m under pressure I have the bad habit of procrastinating. As my deadline looms ever closer, I find myself rebelling against the clock. I have plenty of excuses for what I’m doing. I’m tired after a long day at work. I need to make dinner. There’s a new Hallmark movie starting soon. And if the procrastination is to its highest levels, I need to wash the dishes.
I’m ashamed to say the excuses win out in the fight for my attention. And they are all true and some even good things. My husband is thrilled to come home to a clean kitchen despite the fact that it’s simply a way to further my procrastination. I’m not sure why I do it. I know I shouldn’t do it. I want the pressure to end, but the pressure is what pushes me into procrastination mode. It’s a vicious cycle, and it’s one only I can break.
Andi Hollister from Justice Delayed by Patricia Bradley understands excuses all too well. For years, she has worked to put her sisters murder behind her. Days before the murder’s execution is to take place, circumstances bring to light the possibility that the wrong man is about to die. Andi is hesitant to accept this. Her excuses range from a confession and subsequent conviction to simply not having the strength to face the pain of losing her sister all over again.
Andi is a go-getter when it comes to her job as a reporter. She doesn’t hesitate to do whatever is necessary to get her story. When her attitude leads her into trouble and friends and family tell her she needs to slow down and let God lead her in her actions, Andi has excuses at the ready. The stories need told. Why should she ask for help when she can do it herself? Why should she wait on a God that took her sister from her?
While Andi is searching for the truth about her sister’s murder, she becomes a target herself. Tracking down answers to questions that should have been asked during the first investigation puts Andi in harms way and aggravates an old back injury. It’s this injury that give birth to Andi’s most devastating excuses.
To deal with her physical pain, Andi was prescribed a pain medication. While she knows in her head that pain medication can be dangerous, she has convinced herself that she is immune to becoming addicted. Even as her drug use causes issues for her in her quest for the truth, Andi continues to make excuses. She’s too busy to have the surgery that will correct the back problem. She was prescribed the medication. She’s too smart and capable to fall into the pit of addiction. She is only using when she has pain. Even when she begins to see a problem developing in her use, Andi convinces herself one more dose can’t hurt anything. Besides, she needs it to finish the job.
Some excuses, like the ones I use to justify procrastination, don’t have a great potential for causing harm in my life. They need put in their proper place and dealt with, but missing deadlines and sleepless nights cramming to get the job done are more than likely the worst results I’ll face. Excuses like those Andi uses to justify her drug use are far more deadly. Continuing drug use could cause her to lose her job, her health, and endanger herself and others. The ripples of those choices can keep going forever.
Andi’s excuses to misuse her prescriptions may sound horrible to us, but we need to consider how often we make those types of excuses in our own lives. It may not be for drug use, but how often do we excuse sinful behaviors that come between us and God? How often do we excuse a lie with the idea that it’s only “a little lie”? How often do we gossip about others excusing it because “it’s true”? How often do we ignore the prompting of the Holy Spirit because “we must not have heard Him correctly”? The list could go on and on. We sin in our anger and call it justified. We choose to say or do things we know are not godly because of what others will think of us if we don’t.
We excuse our behaviors as being necessary and not harming anyone, and we can’t honestly say that. And just as bad are the times when we acknowledge our sin and laugh it off because “everyone does it” and “God will forgive it because He knows I’m human”.
It doesn’t matter what excuse we use. Sin is sin, and it puts a wall between us and our heavenly Father. It’s time to rid ourselves of the excuses, acknowledge our sins, and turn away from them. Only when we get rid of the excuses can God work in us to make us more like Christ.

What I’m Reading – A Carol for Kent

Today as I scrolled through one of my social media accounts a post for A Carol for Kent by Hallee Bridgeman came up. On sale for less than a dollar, I couldn’t pass up the chance to get it. I read and reviewed A Melody for James, the first in her Song of Suspense series, a year ago. I’d enjoyed that one, and I was sure I’d like this one as well.

A Carol for Kent is the third in the series. I didn’t pay attention to that fact when I started the book. However, while there were events alluded to that I believe would have been made clear by reading books in the correct order, my lack of knowledge of the second book’s happenings in no way diminished this story. It left me, like every good story will, wanting to know what comes next and in this instance what came before. I don’t doubt books two and four will be added to my kindle account soon.

This story focuses on Carol Mabry, single mother and attorney. She is an expert at separating her home life and her work life which often takes her into gruesome crime scenes. It’s her job to help make sure those criminals end up behind bars for their crimes, but she knows taking home the residue of the cases she works would be detrimental to her daughter, Lisa. And considering Carol was told eight years ago Lisa’s father wanted nothing to do with her, she knows she can’t let her guard down for a minute. A mother’s love is all her daughter has.

That is until country music star Bobby Kent returns home unexpectedly to find he has a child he’s known nothing about. Lies have stolen the last eight years of parenthood from Bobby, and he’s ready to make things right for his little girl.

Carol and Bobby have a lot to overcome in their relationship. The lies that kept them apart, the lies that left Carol alone, ignite anger that runs deep. Distrust based on years of feeling abandoned are not easily overcome either. There is a lot to forgive, and both feel justified in a refusal to do so.  While they both want the best for their daughter, they don’t know if there can be a joined future for themselves.

If that isn’t enough drama for two lives, Carol’s current case is a race against a serial killer. It’s hard to leave this one at the office. The killer seems to obsess about one particular type and doesn’t make mistakes that could mean a break in the case. It’s a fascination that brings the danger right up to Carol’s front door.

I found the mystery element of the story intriguing. I honestly thought the perpetrator was a different character. The real killer surprised me. I’m happy for that. To me, good suspense will surprise  you in the end. Of course, it can’t be such a surprise that the reader feels it came completely out of left field.  Looking back there are subtle clues that gave hints into the killer’s identity, but my mind definitely went a different direction. And the reason for this particular killer’s actions is one that got my attention. I’ve always found the psychological aspects of life interesting, and this story tapped into that.

Just as important as the suspense of the story is the idea of anger and forgiveness. I may not know what it is to deal with serial killers in my life, and believe me, I’m more than grateful for that. But I can relate to anger and the struggle to forgive. When someone hurts you in a way that changes your life forever, letting go of that hurt and not giving in to the anger their actions bring is difficult. When their actions come from pure selfishness and sinfulness, forgiveness is even harder to achieve. It’s easy for the unchecked anger to spill over into other areas of life. And an unforgiving heart becomes bitter in a relatively short amount of time. Carol and Bobby’s story tap into those themes which I believe many of us can understand personally. It allows us to find ourselves in the story and gives us the desire to cheer them on in their growth if we’ve already been there. If we’re still there, it may serve as an encouragement to go through that growth with them.  Either way, these themes work together with the suspense element to create a story that will capture your attention and keep it until the last page.

Here’s where you can find A Carol for Kent.

What I'm Reading – A Carol for Kent

Today as I scrolled through one of my social media accounts a post for A Carol for Kent by Hallee Bridgeman came up. On sale for less than a dollar, I couldn’t pass up the chance to get it. I read and reviewed A Melody for James, the first in her Song of Suspense series, a year ago. I’d enjoyed that one, and I was sure I’d like this one as well.
A Carol for Kent is the third in the series. I didn’t pay attention to that fact when I started the book. However, while there were events alluded to that I believe would have been made clear by reading books in the correct order, my lack of knowledge of the second book’s happenings in no way diminished this story. It left me, like every good story will, wanting to know what comes next and in this instance what came before. I don’t doubt books two and four will be added to my kindle account soon.
This story focuses on Carol Mabry, single mother and attorney. She is an expert at separating her home life and her work life which often takes her into gruesome crime scenes. It’s her job to help make sure those criminals end up behind bars for their crimes, but she knows taking home the residue of the cases she works would be detrimental to her daughter, Lisa. And considering Carol was told eight years ago Lisa’s father wanted nothing to do with her, she knows she can’t let her guard down for a minute. A mother’s love is all her daughter has.
That is until country music star Bobby Kent returns home unexpectedly to find he has a child he’s known nothing about. Lies have stolen the last eight years of parenthood from Bobby, and he’s ready to make things right for his little girl.
Carol and Bobby have a lot to overcome in their relationship. The lies that kept them apart, the lies that left Carol alone, ignite anger that runs deep. Distrust based on years of feeling abandoned are not easily overcome either. There is a lot to forgive, and both feel justified in a refusal to do so.  While they both want the best for their daughter, they don’t know if there can be a joined future for themselves.
If that isn’t enough drama for two lives, Carol’s current case is a race against a serial killer. It’s hard to leave this one at the office. The killer seems to obsess about one particular type and doesn’t make mistakes that could mean a break in the case. It’s a fascination that brings the danger right up to Carol’s front door.
I found the mystery element of the story intriguing. I honestly thought the perpetrator was a different character. The real killer surprised me. I’m happy for that. To me, good suspense will surprise  you in the end. Of course, it can’t be such a surprise that the reader feels it came completely out of left field.  Looking back there are subtle clues that gave hints into the killer’s identity, but my mind definitely went a different direction. And the reason for this particular killer’s actions is one that got my attention. I’ve always found the psychological aspects of life interesting, and this story tapped into that.
Just as important as the suspense of the story is the idea of anger and forgiveness. I may not know what it is to deal with serial killers in my life, and believe me, I’m more than grateful for that. But I can relate to anger and the struggle to forgive. When someone hurts you in a way that changes your life forever, letting go of that hurt and not giving in to the anger their actions bring is difficult. When their actions come from pure selfishness and sinfulness, forgiveness is even harder to achieve. It’s easy for the unchecked anger to spill over into other areas of life. And an unforgiving heart becomes bitter in a relatively short amount of time. Carol and Bobby’s story tap into those themes which I believe many of us can understand personally. It allows us to find ourselves in the story and gives us the desire to cheer them on in their growth if we’ve already been there. If we’re still there, it may serve as an encouragement to go through that growth with them.  Either way, these themes work together with the suspense element to create a story that will capture your attention and keep it until the last page.
Here’s where you can find A Carol for Kent.

Main Character Monday: Nat Montgomery

tieWelcome to Main Character Monday. Today’s guest is Nat Montgomery from Tie-Dyed by Amy C. Blake. Thank you for joining me Nat.

 

If you could choose only one thing to buy without money being an issue, what would you buy?

Before my grandmother Gigi left me enough money to cover tuition for my art history degrees, I would’ve said cash for college, because school is expensive! But now, I’d have to say a tour of the major art museums of the world.

That sounds like a lot of fun. Given your area of study, I’m sure it would be beneficial for you too.

The New Testament tells the story of two sisters who react to Jesus visiting in very different ways. Mary chooses to spend her time with him, while Martha chooses to see to the physical details of his visit. Are you more a Mary or Martha?

I’m a blend of the two. I’m willing to sit, read Scripture, and ponder God’s Word, but I do have to call my thoughts back from wandering to all the things I need to do.

Focus is a difficult thing to achieve when the world doesn’t slow down around you.  “Pure and undefiled religion before God and the Father is this: to visit orphans and widows in their trouble, and to keep oneself unspotted from the world.” James 1:27 – Do you think this verse, lived out would have made a difference in your life? If so, how?

Absolutely. If my mom had lived the “keep oneself unspotted from the world” bit rather than indulging in drugs and live-ins, my childhood would’ve been so much better. Thankfully, Gigi as much as adopted my virtually orphaned self and lived out the gospel before me.

It’s such a blessing when there are people in our lives to help make up for what we’re missing. Your Gigi sounds like a wonderful woman.

What scripture verse would you claim as a life verse?

Romans 8:38-39: “For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord.” Gigi always pressed this passage on me, and I learned the truth of it more deeply during the difficult events of the summer.

If there was one message you could give those reading this interview, what would that be?

Trust God and His great love, even when your life looks like an abysmal mess.

Just for Fun:

Indoors or outdoors: Outdoors—with my bow. I love archery, though I haven’t found a place to shoot yet in DC.

Reading or writing: Reading, definitely. It takes a lot less effort than writing.

Apples or pears: Pears are my favorite!

Early bird or night owl: Did you read the tactics my roommate sometimes has to use to wake me up in the morning?! Night owl, no question.

Nat, please describe Amy C. Blake in three words.

Tall because she’s 5’8, and I’m . . . far shorter than that.

Restrained because she doesn’t usually make the smart-alecky comments that often land me in the doghouse.

Blessed because, unlike me, she has a set of wonderful Christian parents who taught her the love of Jesus from a very young age.

I want to thank Nat for joining me today. And thank you to Amy Blake for sharing her with us. If you’d like to know the rest of Nat’s story, check out Tie-Dyed available now on Amazon.  And while you’re at it, keep reading to find out more about Amy and her books. 

amazon.com/author/amycblake
Now available: Whitewashed, my Christian suspense novel about 18-year-old homeschooler Patience McDonough (Book 1, On the Brink series)
Now available: Colorblind, my Christian suspense about 18-year-old homeschooler Christy Kane (Book 2, On the Brink series)
Now availableTie-Dyed, my Christian suspense about 19-year-old homeschooler Nat Montgomery (Book 3, On the Brink series)
Now available: The Trojan Horse Traitor, my YA fantasy novel about 13-year-old homeschooler Levi Prince and his adventures in Terracaelum (Book 1, Levi Prince series)
Now available: The Fall of Thor’s Hammer, my YA fantasy novel about Levi’s second summer in Terracaelum (Book 2, Levi Prince series)

 

Trust Issues

tieAs a probation officer, my husband has to dissect his clients’ words in effort to find the truth in any given situation. Before that he spent years as an addictions counselor, another profession that requires carefully weighing what you hear someone say against what you see going on in their life. After over twenty years in these professions, this way of interacting with people has not filtered into his non-professional life. By nature he trusts. Optimism comes easily for him and with it a generally positive outlook on people and their motives.

I am my husband’s opposite. Well, almost. I would argue I’m not a pessimist but a realist. I see the negative outcomes as possibilities while still holding onto hope for and working towards the good. It’s a fine line, but that’s a discussion for another day. When it comes to people, I freely admit, I don’t trust easily. That task of weighing and dissecting words and their meanings that my spouse has had to learn comes all too naturally for me.

For some, like Nat Montgomery in Tie-Dyed by Amy C. Blake, experience teaches them not to trust. Nat’s grandma is the only stable thing in her life. Her mother is a functioning addict who has been in and out of her life since she was a child. Even when she was with Nat, her motives were often selfish. Nat doesn’t know her father. When her grandmother dies it feels like the only sure thing in her life other than faith has been taken from her. As she delves into a message her grandma left her, Nat if forced to question if she could even trust her beloved grandma.

Her grandma’s story plunges Nat into a dangerous quest for answers. Pains from the past mingle with the present pushing those around her to questionable and sometimes illegal acts. Nat’s lack of trust influences her to make poor decisions that could cost those she loves, and it keeps her in a state of confusion about those who seek to help her. When events seem darkest, Nat even questions the trustworthiness of God who has taken so much from her. For Nat learning to trust turns into a matter of life and death.

I doubt my instinct against trust will ever lead to a life or death situation. But there is another issue Nat faces that my own issues could lead me to if I’m not careful. When things go horribly wrong in her life, Nat doubts God’s ability to love and care for her. Is she worth God’s love and if not can she say for sure He does? For those who are a little less trusting, either by nature or because circumstances have taught them to be, the danger is in letting the storms of life erode your trust in the only One who is absolutely trustworthy.

How do you build trust that’s unshakeable? Know the one you’re trusting. God tells us everything we need to know about His nature. He gives us examples of times when He’s miraculously rescued people from circumstances, but He’s also shown us how He’s remained faithful to His children even when the situations remained the same. These examples and hundreds of promises have been given to us in His word. When we spend time in scripture finding out who God is and burying His promises deep in our hearts, we strengthen our trust. As hard times come we can hold onto the things we’ve learned. We can pray them back to God, and we can rest knowing He is the same God in our lives that He’s been throughout history. Each time He brings us through our faith is strengthened and our trust grows leaving it stronger for the next challenge of life.

By the Book: Try keeping a journal of God’s provision in your life. Detailing His work in your circumstances will provide a tangible reminder of who God has been to you for your next dark time.

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